(Art) The Pen and Ink of Franklin Booth

Franklin Booth for A Remembered Dream by Henry van Dyke. Scribner's Magazine, August 1917
Franklin Booth for A Remembered Dream by Henry van Dyke. Scribner’s Magazine, August 1917

Franklin Booth, (July 8, 1874 – August 25, 1948) was an American artist known for his detailed pen-and-ink illustrations. He had a unique illustration style based upon his early recreation of wood engraving illustrations with pen and ink. His skill as a draftsman and style made him a popular magazine illustrator in the early 20th-century. Creator of the Nicholson plate, he was one of the first modern ex libris designers in the United States.

Using watercolor, Booth created book illustrations, such as James Whitcomb Riley’s The Flying Islands of the Night. During World War I, he created posters for recruitment, fundraising, and other efforts. As Art Deco style illustrations became popular, his work in latter years was found in commercial publications and catalogs.